1:1 and Parenthood: A Different Perspective

And now, a few thoughts from the other side of the desk…

On Thursday, my 17 year old daughter went to school to pick up the iPad that she will be using for her senior year.  I had already completed the paperwork required by her school district, and I had paid the $30.00 insurance fee (knowing my kid, this will be money well spent!!).  So I was pretty excited to see the actual device in her hands.  Finally, after years of writing about the need for 1:1, my own child will be a willing participant in this new adventure in teaching and learning.  That is so cool…Right?

Friday night she asked me if I would help her set up the iPad.  I said yes, but I could not help until Saturday.  I actually had no intention of helping her, however!  Why?  Because as a Gen Y kid, she should be able to read the directions and do it herself.  Isn’t that part of the point of giving kids their own devices?  They need to become self-directed in their learning, and this starts with setting the thing up.  If she gets stuck, she will need to figure out what to do.  There are tons of resources on the Internet to help her.

On Saturday, I was very busy with honey-do projects, and by dinner time, my daughter had to meet her friends.  Alas, I was not able to help her, so the device sat in the box.  On Sunday we ran errands during the day, and then she went to a concert by some guy named Daughtry so the iPad sat in the box.  Finally, tonight my daughter lost her patience with her “exceedingly busy” dad.  She sat down and pulled up the very explicit directions on how to set up the device.  I looked over her shoulder, and I have to admit that the school did a great job detailing the process for the kids.

Well, my evil plan worked; the kid set up the device by herself.  Sure, she struggled a few times, but that makes the whole experience even better for her.  She figured it out on her own.  The iPad is ready to take her to the outer limits of her learning.  So, I ask this most important question…

Are her teachers ready to guide her to a new type of learning never before experienced by students in schools?  I will ponder the answers to that question as this new school year evolves.  Stay tuned.

What Really Engages All Students?

Is it a fun, friendly, and entertaining teacher?  Sure, for a while that works, until the novelty wears off.  Is it a rigorous curriculum that is filled with academic challenges?  No doubt, as long as the teacher is highly capable of differentiating for all learners.  Maybe it is the incorporation of a totally hands-on, manipulative-based classroom. Definitely.  Especially for those people who think in very concrete ways.  How about a classroom where singing, dancing, and drama are the focal points?  Have you ever heard me sing?  Enough said.
So what is the point of all these questions?  Simply, there is not one perfect teaching style or classroom environment for all students.  Yet, who would argue with the ideal that “no child should be left behind?” We are educators because we want to see all students learn, achieve, succeed, and grow.  I wish I could patent the way to incorporate all of the attributes listed above into one “super-teacher.”

I believe that the typical classrooms of our youth have outlived their usefulness.  No longer can the teacher be the all-knowing giver of the information; the Sage on the Stage.  Teachers need to move past using lecture and rote memorization, and instead, they need to let students take ownership of their learning.  No longer can our teachers do 80% of the talking in a school day.  21st Century students need access to information and they need access to the tools for learning.  Our job as educators is to help them sort it all out correctly.

So how do we do that?  We need to incorporate much more authentic learning into our classrooms.  We need to provide students with work that has intrinsic meaning and adds value to their lives.  For students to be engaged, self-directed learners, they must create projects and solve problems that connect to the world beyond the classroom.  Working with our students to solve authentic problems is what will engage them in learning.  This is what will engage them in substantive conversations and whet their appetites for a depth of knowledge never before seen in our schools.

True authentic learning will engage all learners because the topics will be real for them.  The academically gifted student, the musician, the artist, the athlete, the mechanically inclined child, and the highly dramatic kid, all can find success in a problem-based environment in which they are expected to work together and use their individual strengths to solve real problems.

In a few weeks, our students each will be handed their own personal learning device to be used in school and at home.  In my opinion, this will be the moment of truth for our teachers.  Why?  Because the students will have access to a wealth of information at their fingertips, and they no longer will need to depend on their teachers to feed them the facts.  Instead, students should be challenged to find the facts, and then use what they have discovered to collaborate, create, and solve real-world problems.

Teachers in the 21st Century must change and adapt to keep up with their students.  The time has come for teachers to move away from rote memorization, repetitive practice, silent study without conversation, and brief exposure to topics, and instead, move closer to authentic learning in a 1:1 learning environment.

 

screen-shot-2012-01-28-at-8-51-04-pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Image approved for copy by Creative Commons. Source: http://bit.ly/vYUkXB

Let the 1:1 Fun Begin!!

In 2009 I started posting about the idea of 1:1 computing in classrooms.  Five years ago, the idea of giving each child his or her own device was more of a dream than a reality for me.  Back then, the devices were more costly, and our Broadband capabilities were not in place to handle 600+ devices all connecting to the Internet during the school day.  The idea was exciting, but our school district was not ready for implementation.  We were able to purchase some netbook carts to be shared by teachers. This was a very good start at the time, and the staff and students were excited to use these machines.

The start of this school year, however, marks the realization of the dream to equip every student with his or her own device in a 1:1 learning environment.  All kids in grades K-2 will be receiving an iPad, and all students in grades 3 through 8 will be receiving a Chromebook on the first day of school.  Kudos to our board of education, district administrators, and some pilot teachers who worked so hard and tirelessly last year to make this a reality.  Well, here we are, ready to embark on more than a new school year; we are moving into a new era of teaching and learning.  NOW is when the really hard work begins.

So, what is my role in a 1:1 learning environment? I believe the teachers are the key to successfully implementing the1:1 initiative.  As a principal, I think my job will be to support them in as many ways as possible.  I will have to listen to them, problem-solve with them, celebrate successes with them, and support them when they feel frustrated.  I will need to work students as they are using the devices, and throughout it all, I will need to learn what types of PD will be needed to support the teachers.  I will need to stay current on the most effective tools and techniques for teaching in a new-era classroom, and I will need to find time for teaches to share, plan, and observe others using these devices.  Additionally, my role will be to model the use of technology and to be a “cheerleader” to the staff as they strive to change their teaching methodology.

Last week I attended the Leyden 1:1 Symposium.  The keynotes were very inspiring, and the sessions I attended were very informative.    I learned about such tools as Socrative, AnswerGarden, and TodaysMeet, and I learned more about the SAMR model.  I saw how Google+, Google Sites, and blogging can be incorporated into classrooms, and I learned about assessment in a 1:1 learning environment. Speaking with others who are either starting the 1:1 process or who have been doing it for a while was another important component of the three days I spent at Leyden.

Now, as we have entered the month of August, I am psyched to get the 1:1 teaching and learning started.  I have a sense that there will be a lot more questions than answers as we embark on this new adventure as a school and as a district.  But, that is what makes our work so interesting, and I plan on getting myself right in the thick of it all!  My goal is to use this blog as a place to share my experiences and points of view during the rollout and continuing implementation of 1:1 classroom learning environments.  I hope to write at least one post per week on this topic, and I hope to get some good dialogue going with anyone who is interested.

To quote my favorite baseball broadcaster, Ken “Hawk” Harrelson, “Sit back, relax, and strap it down” because this year is going to be quite the ride!

Does Anyone Still Blog?

My last blog post was about one year ago.  And before that post, I was barely able to add a post or two to this blog every few months.  Why?  It’s because I have spent the last four years of my life working, taking doctoral classes, and writing my doctoral dissertation.  I defended it last Friday, and I am now DONE with college forever!

So, I have been away from the edu-blogosphere for a long time – having been in school for the last four years.  I have not had the time to pay much attention to the world of blogging.

Now that Twitter is all the rage (along with lots of other social media sites) does anyone actually write blog posts anymore?  Am I still living in 2009?  Have those in my PLN stopped writing thought-provoking posts in favor of 140 characters and a cute Twitpic?

Back in the day, when lots of educators were blogging, I kept track of all the new posts via RSS feeds.  Do people still do that?  If so, what site are people using for this?  I feel like a 21st century Rip Van Winkle after waking up and re-visiting my blog.

So, what is going on out there?

Unbiased Interviewing? Check out “The Voice”

I am NOT a reality TV fan (except for live sports which are the original reality TV shows).  But, I started watching The Voice on NBC, and I have to admit that I really like it.  What makes this show different from all the other singing shows on television is that the judges face backward when each new singer comes on stage to audition.  They do not see the contestants walk on stage and perform at the onset of the song.  They only hear “The Voice.”   They can only make a judgment on the contestants’ musical abilities; not on her looks.

However, if a judge likes what he or she hears, he or she hits a button and the chair turns around.  If at least one judge turns the chair around, then that contestant is allowed to stay on the show and compete.  If more than one judge turns around, then the judges have to convince the contestant why he or she should choose a specific judge’s team.

The show is the epitome of the phrase “You can’t judge a book by its cover.”

I find it quite interesting to see the judges’ reactions when they match up “The Voice” with “The Face.” Often, there is some surprise on the judges’ parts.  I love how anyone with a great singing voice can be a winner on this show.  Shallow appearances do not play a role in the judging.

This is fascinating to me, and I think this concept can (should?) be applied to how school administrators evaluate teaching candidates.  As hard as we all try, it is difficult in this shallow world in which we live to not judge candidates by their looks, their dress, their race, their haircuts, or their physical disabilities when they enter the interview room.  Un-shined shoes, messy hair, crooked teeth, or walking with a cane DO NOT determine whether a person is a good teacher.

What does make a good teacher is how she answers our questions and the experiences she brings to our schools.  Is she student-centered?  Does he understand how to differentiate the curriculum or use formative assessment to inform his instruction?  Can she give specific examples of how she  disciplines with dignity?  How will he establish a positive classroom climate?  These are the reasons we should be hiring our teachers.

So, should we always hold “blind auditions” for our new teachers?  Should interviews only take place over the phone?  I think sitting with our backs to the candidates might be perceived as rude, but are there other ways we can find the very best teachers without the superficial biases that the media has engrained in our heads?

Finally, I think we should be interviewing teacher candidates as a team of administrators like they do on The Voice instead of each of us interviewing separately.  In districts with more than one school, this is important because new teachers may need to move to another school in a subsequent year, and all of the administrators need to agree on who gets hired.

Hiring season is upon us.  These are important questions and thoughts that principals and other school administrators should be considering.

Disability Awareness Week

We just finished disability awareness week in our school.  This is a week full of activities to help all children become more sensitive to those with disabilities, and to help build a sense of empathy for people living with disabilities.  The activities are organized by parents, many of whom have children with disabilities.  The parents volunteer to spend an hour or so in each classroom conducting interesting and thought-proving activities with students in grades K-5.

So, I just came across this video on my Facebook page, and I will be sharing this with teachers and parents.  I think this is a wonderful example of someone who did not let a disability keep him from fulfilling his dream.

Enjoy!